Truman Student Seminar: Does Democracy Matter? An Empirical Inquiry into the Effect of Political Regimes on Climate Change

Muinul Islam
Start
End
Location
Middlebush 111
Add to Calendar 2020-02-19 13:00:00 2020-02-19 15:00:00 Truman Student Seminar: Does Democracy Matter? An Empirical Inquiry into the Effect of Political Regimes on Climate Change Abstract Do democracies respond differently to the problem of CO2 emission than countries with authoritarian regimes? Previous studies that examine the role of democracy on environmental problems are mixed and ambiguous. Some studies demonstrate that democracy is negatively correlated with climate change like CO2 emission or environmental pollution (Bättig & Bernauer, 2009; Burnell, 2012), while some other studies show the opposite (Mao, 2018; Midlarsky, 1998). Furthermore, many of the empirical investigations of the existing studies are fraught with methodological limitations. Using time-series cross-sectional (TSCS) data with more spatial (160 countries) and temporal coverage (1990-2014), the study evaluates the effect of democracy in reducing the CO2 emission as a way of a robustness check. The study uses different panel data estimation, including fixed effect, GLS random effect, the PCSE, and ‘Within- Between’ estimation using MLwiN 3.04. The study contributes to (1) testing the democracy-CO2 correlation across different indices of democracy, and, (2) improving upon much of the literature in terms of data coverage and statistical techniques. When compared across different estimation strategies, the study finds a steady and moderate negative correlation of all five measures of democracy with CO2 emission, indicating that democracy may work better in the reduction of CO2 emission. Middlebush 111 Harry S Truman School of Public Affairs truman@missouri.edu America/Chicago public

Abstract

Do democracies respond differently to the problem of CO2 emission than countries with authoritarian regimes? Previous studies that examine the role of democracy on environmental problems are mixed and ambiguous. Some studies demonstrate that democracy is negatively correlated with climate change like CO2 emission or environmental pollution (Bättig & Bernauer, 2009; Burnell, 2012), while some other studies show the opposite (Mao, 2018; Midlarsky, 1998). Furthermore, many of the empirical investigations of the existing studies are fraught with methodological limitations. Using time-series cross-sectional (TSCS) data with more spatial (160 countries) and temporal coverage (1990-2014), the study evaluates the effect of democracy in reducing the CO2 emission as a way of a robustness check. The study uses different panel data estimation, including fixed effect, GLS random effect, the PCSE, and ‘Within- Between’ estimation using MLwiN 3.04. The study contributes to (1) testing the democracy-CO2 correlation across different indices of democracy, and, (2) improving upon much of the literature in terms of data coverage and statistical techniques. When compared across different estimation strategies, the study finds a steady and moderate negative correlation of all five measures of democracy with CO2 emission, indicating that democracy may work better in the reduction of CO2 emission.