Saving the Planet Cost-Effectively

Phi Beta Kappa Visiting Scholar Professor Joseph Aldy, Harvard University
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Zoom: https://umsystem.zoom.us/j/94887784970?pwd=YjRFbWZOUkVxYSs5TG5JVjM5Zy8rdz09
Add to Calendar 2020-10-05 17:30:00 2020-10-05 18:30:00 Saving the Planet Cost-Effectively Through increasingly intense and frequent forest fires, hurricanes, flooding, and heat waves, climate change poses tremendous risks to our civilization. To combat climate change, governments around the world have implemented carbon pricing programs that discourage the combustion of coal, oil, and gas and encourage renewable power and energy efficiency investments. In the United States, the range of advocates for a carbon tax span the political landscape, from economist Arthur Laffer to climate scientist Jim Hansen. As Washington DC delays taking action on climate change, a dozen states have priced carbon emissions through pollution markets. What does it mean to price carbon? What would it mean for our everyday lives? What would it mean for the environment? What are the political opportunities and barriers to moving forward with carbon pricing? Can carbon pricing deliver a Green New Deal, or is it a ploy to undermine ambitious efforts to cut greenhouse gas emissions? This presentation will draw from the theory and practice of carbon pricing and pollution markets more generally to address these questions and explore the design of future U.S. climate change policy. Joseph E. Aldy is Professor of the Practice of Public Policy and the Harvard Kennedy School, a University Fellow at Resources for the Future, a Faculty Research Fellow at Resources for the Future, a Faculty Research Fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research and a Senior Adviser at the Center for Strategic and International Studies. Virtual visit sponsored by Phi Beta Kappa (Alpha of Missouri Chapter), Department of Economics, Department of Political Science, and Truman School of Public Affairs Zoom: https://umsystem.zoom.us/j/94887784970?pwd=YjRFbWZOUkVxYSs5TG5JVjM5Zy8rdz09 Harry S Truman School of Public Affairs truman@missouri.edu America/Chicago public

Through increasingly intense and frequent forest fires, hurricanes, flooding, and heat waves, climate change poses tremendous risks to our civilization. To combat climate change, governments around the world have implemented carbon pricing programs that discourage the combustion of coal, oil, and gas and encourage renewable power and energy efficiency investments. In the United States, the range of advocates for a carbon tax span the political landscape, from economist Arthur Laffer to climate scientist Jim Hansen. As Washington DC delays taking action on climate change, a dozen states have priced carbon emissions through pollution markets. What does it mean to price carbon? What would it mean for our everyday lives? What would it mean for the environment? What are the political opportunities and barriers to moving forward with carbon pricing? Can carbon pricing deliver a Green New Deal, or is it a ploy to undermine ambitious efforts to cut greenhouse gas emissions? This presentation will draw from the theory and practice of carbon pricing and pollution markets more generally to address these questions and explore the design of future U.S. climate change policy.

Joseph E. Aldy is Professor of the Practice of Public Policy and the Harvard Kennedy School, a University Fellow at Resources for the Future, a Faculty Research Fellow at Resources for the Future, a Faculty Research Fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research and a Senior Adviser at the Center for Strategic and International Studies.

Virtual visit sponsored by Phi Beta Kappa (Alpha of Missouri Chapter), Department of Economics, Department of Political Science, and Truman School of Public Affairs

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